Previous | Next
Sugarloaf Ski Area | Sugarloaf Ski Map | by James Niehues
Sugarloaf Ski Area | Sugarloaf Ski Map | by James Niehues
Sugarloaf Ski Map

Sugarloaf Ski Area

 

When describing Sugarloaf it can be hard to know where to start. There are so many things that make it special. One obvious distinction is that Sugarloaf offers the only above-treeline skiing on the East Coast, so if you want that true alpine skiing experience it should be high on your list. It’s also a relatively large ski area, with 1,200 acres and 160 runs to choose from, making it the second biggest ski resort on the East Coast. All of that adds up to 60 miles of ski trails - good luck riding each one in the course of a weekend! It’s no wonder that so many skiers look back at days spent at Sugarloaf fondly.

James Niehues painted this Sugarloaf ski map in 2000, and he approached it with his signature eye for detail. He took extensive aerial photos of the mountain and then used them to create a layout that captures the extent of Sugarloaf’s terrain, along with the beauty of surrounding peaks. If this mountain in Western Maine means something to you, you’ll appreciate the care Niehues put into this painting.

 

Location: Carrabassett Valley, Franklin County, Maine United States

Nearest city: Farmington

Coordinates: 45°01′53″N 70°18′47″W

Vertical: 2,820 feet (860 m)

Top elevation: 4,237 feet (1,291 m)

Base elevation: 1,417 feet (432 m)

Skiable area: 1,240 acres (500 ha)

Runs: 160

Longest run: 3.5 miles (5.6 km)

Lift system: 14

Lift capacity: 21,810 Skiers per hour

Terrain parks: 3 (+ Superpipe)

Snowfall: 200 inches (510 cm) (10 year average)

Snowmaking: 95%

Night skiing: No

Sugarloaf Ski Map

Sugarloaf in Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Painted in 2000

Our custom black wooden frames feature a deep, squared profile to showcase Niehues’ timeless work. Frame width ranges from ⅞ to 1 ⅝ inches, dependent upon on print size, and features a non-glare acrylic front plus foamcore backing. 

Take the entire Book home with you today

The Man Behind The Maps Book

Sugarloaf Ski Area

 

When describing Sugarloaf it can be hard to know where to start. There are so many things that make it special. One obvious distinction is that Sugarloaf offers the only above-treeline skiing on the East Coast, so if you want that true alpine skiing experience it should be high on your list. It’s also a relatively large ski area, with 1,200 acres and 160 runs to choose from, making it the second biggest ski resort on the East Coast. All of that adds up to 60 miles of ski trails - good luck riding each one in the course of a weekend! It’s no wonder that so many skiers look back at days spent at Sugarloaf fondly.

James Niehues painted this Sugarloaf ski map in 2000, and he approached it with his signature eye for detail. He took extensive aerial photos of the mountain and then used them to create a layout that captures the extent of Sugarloaf’s terrain, along with the beauty of surrounding peaks. If this mountain in Western Maine means something to you, you’ll appreciate the care Niehues put into this painting.

 

Location: Carrabassett Valley, Franklin County, Maine United States

Nearest city: Farmington

Coordinates: 45°01′53″N 70°18′47″W

Vertical: 2,820 feet (860 m)

Top elevation: 4,237 feet (1,291 m)

Base elevation: 1,417 feet (432 m)

Skiable area: 1,240 acres (500 ha)

Runs: 160

Longest run: 3.5 miles (5.6 km)

Lift system: 14

Lift capacity: 21,810 Skiers per hour

Terrain parks: 3 (+ Superpipe)

Snowfall: 200 inches (510 cm) (10 year average)

Snowmaking: 95%

Night skiing: No

"The 'Rembrandt of snow' has published a hefty coffee table book with a collection of nearly all of his hand-painted maps."




Timeless art for your home

It is then printed using museum quality reproduction on archival paper using the latest giclee ink-jet technology.

Legendary Ski Artist James Niehues

If you are a skier or snowboarder, there is a good chance James Niehues has been your mountain guide. Throughout his 30 year career he has worked at the  smallest hills and the most expansive resorts in North America.  He has left his mark in South America, Australia, Asia and Europe too.   And even if you have never shared a bottomless powder day with him, he has always been close by.